Pack your bags and begin "Livin the Dream" in this secluded home away from home! Winding off the Parkway between Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge, Livin the Dream goes beyond the expected to provide you with the ultimate cabin retreat. Discover serenity and mountain grandeur in this breathtaking cabin where you will find convenience in a lush wooded setting. As you…
The park is home to some 2,000 to 3,000 elk in summer, and between 800 and 1,000 elk spend the winter within its boundaries. Because of lack of predation, the National Park Service culls around 50 elk each winter. Overgrazing by elk has become a major problem in the park's riparian areas, so much so that the NPS fences them out of many critical wetland habitats to let willows and aspens grow. The program seems to be working, as the deciduous wetland plants thrive within the fencing. Many people think the elk herd is too large, but are reluctant to reintroduce predators because of its proximity to large human populations and ranches.[76]
The park is home to many predatory animals, including Canadian lynx, foxes, bobcat, cougar, black bear, and coyotes. Wolves and grizzly bears were extirpated in the early 1900s. Most of these predators kill smaller animals, but mountain lions and coyotes kill deer and occasionally elk. Bears also eat larger prey. Moose have no predators in the park. Black bears are relatively uncommon in the park, numbering only 24-35 animals. They also have fewer cubs and the bears seem skinnier than they do in most areas.[79] Canadian lynx are quite rare within the park, and they have probably spread north from the San Juan Mountains, where they were reintroduced in 1999. Cougars feed mainly on mule deer in the park, and live 10–13 years. Cougar territories can be as large as 500 square miles.[80] Coyotes hunt both alone and in pairs, but occasionally hunt in packs. They mainly feed on rodents but occasionally bring down larger animals, including deer, and especially fawns and elk calves. Scat studies in Moraine Park showed that their primary foods were deer and rodents. They form strong family bonds and are very vocal.[81]
Love to save money on your next getaway or vacation to the Pigeon Forge or Gatlinburg area of the Smoky Mountains? Are you looking for an affordable Pigeon Forge or Gatlinburg cabin to rent for under $100? We offer several cabins under $100. Below, you will find many cabins under $100 to choose from. Some cabins may say over $100 per night, but when you combine our specials and promotions, the average nightly rate is below $100 per night. Browse the list of cabins under $100 in Pigeon Forge and Gatlinburg below. If you have any questions or you’re looking for the best deal, call us today and speak with one of our vacation rental experts.
Anything is better than having multiple stop lights at a single intersection. Kudows for CDOT for thinking outside the box to find a solution that can accommodate more traffic. Sadly since we have built a city entirely dependent on single occupancy vehicles to get around it will just push the bottle neck to a different part of the traffic grid. But every little bit of efficiency helps.

This charming cabin is found in Nederland, Colorado, right in the thick of the wilderness. This spacious cabin will give newlyweds the perfect setting to begin the start of married life with the comfort of high-end amenities and gorgeous views of the great outdoors from the comfort of an incredible accommodation. With all the amenities and facilities you would need for a home, a full kitchen, queen sized bed, full entertainment system, and a BBQ, couples will love their escape to this rental. This cabin is nestled into the Rocky Mountains, providing couples with a lot of new adventures to embark on.
At about 68 million years ago, the Front Range began to rise again due to the Laramide orogeny in the west.[58][59] During the Cenozoic era, block uplift formed the present Rocky Mountains. The geologic composition of Rocky Mountain National Park was also affected by deformation and erosion during that era. The uplift disrupted the older drainage patterns and created the present drainage patterns.[60]

The Historic Dripping Springs Resort sits along the riverbanks under ponderosa pines and quaking aspens, conveniently located just minutes from Estes Park. Whimsical rooms and cabins with country gourmet breakfasts are our signature. Couples enjoy romantic nights and walks along the river walk. Seek the bubbling hot waters and have champagne toasts in your private outdoor hot tub and have a soothing massage or steam sauna by the river. Natural setting with Rocky Mountain hospitality. Elopements, romance packages, weddings, and any special occasion, our hideaway in the forest is the perfect spot for you.
Moraine Park: Campers, particularly hikers, favor this year-round campground, where several trails originate. It's easily accessed via Bear Lake Road, near the park's Beaver Meadows Entrance (southwest), and features 244 sites, all able to be reserved. It allows RVs up to 40 feet long and accommodates them further with a dump station and water hook-ups. Group sites also are available. 
"Live-a-Little" is a 2-bedroom, 2-bathroom richly decorated cabin that can comfortably sleep 8 in a beautiful resort just minutes from the downtown Gatlinburg! Offering wooded and pond views (fishing is not permitted) and lots of room, this is the place to bring your whole family for a trip you won't forget. Relax with your evening hot chocolate in front of…
I would definitely recommend driving Trail Ridge Rd. between Grand Lake and Estes Park.  This is a great drive through the entire park with lots of great pull outs and stops along the way.  Be aware that this is the highest paved road on the continent at over 12,000ft. elevation and altitude sickness affects 50% of the visitors.  Trail Ridge Rd. is very scary to drive if you're not used to curvy roads with no guards rails.  Without stops, it will take 1.5hrs to drive from town to town.  Because we stopped so much, it took us 4 hrs to get from Estes Park to Grand Lake, we ate dinner in Grand Lake and then it took us 1.5 hrs to drive straight back.
The history of Rocky Mountain National Park began when Paleo-Indians traveled along what is now Trail Ridge Road to hunt and forage for food.[11][12] Ute and Arapaho people subsequently hunted and camped in the area.[13][14] In 1820, the Long Expedition, led by Stephen H. Long for whom Longs Peak was named, approached the Rockies via the Platte River.[15][16] Settlers began arriving in the mid-1800s,[17] displacing the Native Americans who mostly left the area voluntarily by 1860,[18] while others were removed to reservations by 1878.[14]

My boyfriend and I completed this hike on Sat Feb 9. We wore snowshoes the whole way, though they weren't necessary up to Dream Lake. Beyond Dream, however, they're absolutely necessary. We passed a couple people who didn't have them and they were postholing all over the place and making a mess of the trail. Beware that the sign marking the Dream-Haiyaha trail split is almost completely buried and we didn't see any other trail signs so they must be buried too. The trail is very soft and fluffy, with narrow sections cutting across steep drop offs. Even with snowshoes we were sinking in and sliding in a few places.
During the winter most of Trail Ridge Road is closed due to heavy snow, limiting motorized access to the edges of the park.[68] Winter activities include snowshoeing and cross-country skiing which are possible from either the Estes Park or Grand Lake entrances. On the east side near Estes Park, skiing and snowshoeing trails are available off Bear Lake Road, such as the Bear Lake, Bierstadt Lake, and Sprague Lake trails and at Hidden Valley. Slopes for sledding are also available at Hidden Valley. The west side of the park near Grand Lake also has viable snowshoeing trails.[68][88] Backcountry skiing and snowboarding can be enjoyed after climbing up one of the higher slopes, especially late in the snow season after avalanche danger has subsided[89], and technical climbing remains also a possibility, although typically differing in style from the summer months[90].
Features: This hike is a good drive away from the resort. You’ll spend about an hour and a half on highway 34 heading towards Grand Lake before you reenter the Park to check out Adams Falls. That said, the drive is gorgeous, and you’ll sweep over the Continental Divide. Once you’re at Adams Falls, you’ll have a short hike to view falls along the East Inlet of Grand Lake. The aptly named Adams Falls Trail features a 55-foot waterfall. You can continue along the East Inlet Trail to view more of the river, as well as Lone Pine Lake, Lake Verna, Spirit Lake, and other gorgeous sites.
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