Not everyone wants a honeymoon on the beach or has the time to make it out to a tropical location. Colorado is an amazing destination for a honeymoon. Imagine dipping into a steaming outdoor hot tub right outside your honeymoon cabin, or spending time cuddling next to a cozy fireplace inside.  Here are some inviting and romantic cabins all around Colorado that are perfect for a honeymoon.
We ended up doing Sprague Lake, which is a nice, leisurely walk along a paved path by the lake. It was a beautiful view. I only wish it wasn't so cloudy that day. Next, we drove to the Copeland Falls trail, which is a 0.3 hike from the trailhead of Wild Basin. But to the falls and back is a bit over two miles. Barely anyone was on the trail, which was nice but also creepy at the same time.
Baker Pass crosses the Continental Divide through the Never Summer Mountains and into the Michigan River drainage to the west of Mount Nimbus[36]—a drainage that feeds streams and rivers that drain into the Gulf of Mexico.[28] Other mountain passes are La Poudre Pass and Thunder Pass, which was once used by stage coaches and is a route to Michigan Lakes. Little Yellowstone has geological features similar to the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. The Green Mountain trail once was a wagon road used to haul hay from Big Meadows. Flattop Mountain, which can be accessed from the eastern and western sides of the park, is near Green Mountain. Shadow Mountain Lookout—a wildfire observation tower—is on the National Register of Historic Places.[36] Paradise Park Natural Area is an essentially hidden and protected wild area with no maintained trails penetrating it.[39]
The Fawn Valley Inn is right on the Fall River, just 5 minutes from Estes Park. You can go trout fishing right on the property. You are only a short drive away from horseback riding, white-water rafting, chuck-wagon dinners and Rocky Mountain National Park. It is not unusual to see deer, elk, fox or bighorn sheep from your window. There are a variety of accommodations, from riverside condos to romantic cabins for two, and it is only a short drive into town to visit the quaint shops and pick up that memento that you will treasure forever.
When planning your next family vacation, you will not find a more inviting campground than Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park Camp-Resort. Besides having the best cabin rentals available, Jellystone Parks are the cleanest, friendliest parks in North America. The campground staff is knowledgeable, and always available to assist you during your stay at our campgrounds.
Categories: IUCN Category IIRocky Mountain National ParkRocky MountainsHistory of the Rocky MountainsArchaeological sites in ColoradoBiosphere reserves of the United StatesCivilian Conservation Corps in ColoradoNational parks in ColoradoNational parks of the Rocky MountainsProtected areas established in 1915Protected areas of Boulder County, ColoradoProtected areas of Grand County, ColoradoProtected areas of Larimer County, ColoradoProtected areas on the Colorado River1915 establishments in Colorado
Skiiers: Have everything taken care of for you so that all you have to worry about is the snow. This cabin is just outside of Crested Butte, which was named Best Ski Town in North America by Powder Magazine. A free shuttle can get you to the base and you can store all of your skiing and outdoor equipment at the cabin. Check out that front porch swing with an amazing view of the mountains!
I would definitely recommend driving Trail Ridge Rd. between Grand Lake and Estes Park.  This is a great drive through the entire park with lots of great pull outs and stops along the way.  Be aware that this is the highest paved road on the continent at over 12,000ft. elevation and altitude sickness affects 50% of the visitors.  Trail Ridge Rd. is very scary to drive if you're not used to curvy roads with no guards rails.  Without stops, it will take 1.5hrs to drive from town to town.  Because we stopped so much, it took us 4 hrs to get from Estes Park to Grand Lake, we ate dinner in Grand Lake and then it took us 1.5 hrs to drive straight back.
Apart from elk, many other ungulates reside in the park, including bighorn sheep, moose, and mule deer. Bison were eliminated from the park in the 1800s, as were pronghorn and moose, the latter of which was restored to the area in 1978. Moose are now frequently seen in the park, especially on the park's west side.[77] The park's bighorn sheep population has recovered and is estimated at 350 animals.[78]
Cow Creek Trail follows Cow Creek, with its many beaver ponds, extending past the Bridal Falls turnoff as the Dark Mountain trail, then joining the Black Canyon trail to intersect the Lawn Lake trail shortly below the lake.[42] North Boundary Trail connects to the Lost Lake trail system. North Fork Trail begins outside of the park in the Comanche Peak Wilderness before reaching the park boundary and ending at Lost Lake. Stormy Peaks Trail connects Colorado State University's Pingree Park campus in the Comanche Peak Wilderness and the North Fork Trail inside the park.[42]
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