Once a mountain mining town, Breckenridge now is all about outdoor adventure. It’s one of Colorado's top year round alpine getaways, with all-season activities galore. When the snow falls, skiers, boarders and snow bunnies from all over flock to Breckenridge for its four peaks. In the summer months, visitors trek the pristine hiking trails and paddle the rivers, while anytime of year, they enjoy the good local beers, original mountain music, and wonderful homes and cottages.

Range Property Management is filled with vacation getaways of all sizes, shapes, and descriptions. We have a wonderful variety of cabins, condos, and homes in the Estes Park and surrounding areas. We can find the perfect place for your vacation, weather you prefer to walk to downtown shops or stay in a secluded cabin at the end of a mountain road. Come “Home” after a day in Rocky Mountain National Park and enjoy the beauty of the mountains.   


When planning your next family vacation, you will not find a more inviting campground than Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park Camp-Resort. Besides having the best cabin rentals available, Jellystone Parks are the cleanest, friendliest parks in North America. The campground staff is knowledgeable, and always available to assist you during your stay at our campgrounds.
Colorado is best known for its astounding backdrop of mountains, plains, deserts, and forests. During the colder months, the state is a prime destination for winter sports. Skiing and snowboarding are extremely popular thanks to the world-class conditions. In the summertime, opportunities to hike, raft, rock climb, and camp are endless. No matter what time of year you plan to visit, you will find a reason to get outdoors.
The Rocky Mountain National Park Act was signed by President Woodrow Wilson on January 26, 1915, establishing the park boundaries and protecting the area for future generations.[2] The Civilian Conservation Corps built the main automobile route, Trail Ridge Road, in the 1930s.[2] In 1976, UNESCO designated the park as one of the first World Biosphere Reserves.[6] In 2017, more than 4.4 million recreational visitors entered the park.[7] The park is one of the most visited in the National Park System, ranking as the third most visited national park in 2015.[8]

Precambrian metamorphic rock formed the core of the North American continent during the Precambrian eon 4.5–1 billion years ago. During the Paleozoic era, western North America was submerged beneath a shallow sea, with a seabed composed of limestone and dolomite deposits many kilometers thick.[54] Pikes Peak granite formed during the late Precambrian eon, continuing well into the Paleozoic era, when mass quantities of molten rock flowed, amalgamated, and formed the continents about 1 billion–300 million years ago. Concurrently, in the period from 500–300 million years ago, the region began to sink while lime and mud sediments were deposited in the vacated space. Eroded granite produced sand particles that formed strata—layers of sediment—in the sinking basin.[55]

Della Terra offers fourteen luxury suites,a lodge room with three-sided stone fireplace and waterfall, private spa treatment room, dry heat sauna, library, theatre room, styling salon, and espresso bar. Each suite features a see-thru fireplace, private balcony with 2 person hot tub, sitting nook with arched window, soaking tub before a romantic water feature, walk-thru jetted shower. Our suites are designed to celebrate and embrace the earth's elements, the seasons, or the skies.


Rocky Mountain National Park was selected to participate in a climate change study, along with two other National Park Service areas in the Rocky Mountain region and three in the Appalachian Mountain region.[50] The study began in 2011, orchestrated by members of the academic scientific community in cooperation with the National Park Service and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).[50] The stated objective: "develop and apply decision support tools that use NASA and other data and models to assess vulnerability of ecosystems and species to climate and land use change and evaluate management options."[51]
Features: This hike is a good drive away from the resort. You’ll spend about an hour and a half on highway 34 heading towards Grand Lake before you reenter the Park to check out Adams Falls. That said, the drive is gorgeous, and you’ll sweep over the Continental Divide. Once you’re at Adams Falls, you’ll have a short hike to view falls along the East Inlet of Grand Lake. The aptly named Adams Falls Trail features a 55-foot waterfall. You can continue along the East Inlet Trail to view more of the river, as well as Lone Pine Lake, Lake Verna, Spirit Lake, and other gorgeous sites.
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