About 300 million years ago, the land was uplifted creating the ancestral Rocky Mountains.[55] Fountain Formation was deposited during the Pennsylvanian period of the Paleozoic era, 290–296 million years ago. Over the next 150 million years, the mountains uplifted, continued to erode, and covered themselves in their own sediment. Wind, gravity, rainwater, snow, and glacial ice eroded the granite mountains over geologic time scales.[56] The Ancestral Rockies were eventually buried under subsequent strata.[57]
The Pool is a large turbulent water pocket formed below where Spruce and Fern Creeks join the Big Thompson River. The winter route is along a gravel road, which leads to a trail at the Fern Lake trailhead. Along the route are beaver-cut aspen, frozen waterfalls on the cliffs, and the Arch Rocks.[44] The trail to Alberta Falls runs by Glacier Creek and Glacier Gorge.[44]
Glacial geology in Rocky Mountain National Park can be seen from the mountain peaks to the valley floors. Ice is a powerful sculptor of this natural environment and large masses of moving ice are the most powerful tools. Telltale marks of giant glaciers can be seen all throughout the park. Streams and glaciations during the Quaternary period cut through the older sediment, creating mesa tops and alluvial plains, and revealing the present Rocky Mountains.[61] The glaciation removed as much as 5,000 feet (1,500 m) of sedimentary rocks from earlier inland sea deposits. This erosion exposed the basement rock of the Ancestral Rockies. Evidence of the uplifting and erosion can be found on the way to Rocky Mountain National Park in the hogbacks of the Front Range foothills.[60] Many sedimentary rocks from the Paleozoic and Mesozoic eras exist in the basins surrounding the park.[62]
Our award winning Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Parks have everything you and your family will need to make long lasting camping memories. From amazing water zones including splashparks and splash pads, to mini golf, wagon rides, volleyball and fishing to themed weekends and family camping oriented activities including appearances from Yogi Bear™ and friends – you’ll notice that family fun at our family campgrounds is the main attraction! And with over 80 locations in the United States and Canada, you will have a quality camping experience that is close to home.
Did some snowshoeing today(2/17/19), great conditions for it! We got to the trail and started about 8:45 am, snow was still fresh. Parking lot wasn’t too crowded and didn’t really see too many others until we were heading back. Only a few spots uphill, relatively even terrain with nice views. Did Copeland Falls and Calypso Cascades, a short part of Ouzel falls to the overlook, which was a good point to turn around.
To get an educational overview of the park, it's wise to stop in at one of RMNP's visitor centers, such as Beaver Meadows. According to recent visitors, the park rangers are extremely helpful and knowledgeable and can help you decide which trails to take, depending on your time and skill level. Along with books and maps, you can also purchase (or rent) equipment like walking sticks or cleats.  
Marissa is a writer for 303 Magazine’s Travel, Lifestyle + Culture Desk. She grew up in Canada, but spent her adult life navigating South Carolina as a Canadian transplant. She secretly enjoys the cold weather in Colorado, but complains about it anyway. In her free time, you can find her bothering her friends to go out, watching comedy shows or driving long distances to see something cool she read about online. All wit and charm is 85% her parents and 15% something she learned in middle school from the 8th graders on her bus. Follow her on Twitter @marissajkozma
Year-round lodgings include a historic, romantic 2 bedroom cabin with jetted tub and gas fireplace, a one bedroom cabin with sleeping loft, wood fireplace and jetted tub, plus other cabins and lodge rooms.  All non-smoking units have free wireless internet and local phone, fridge, microwave, coffeemaker, cable TV and are air-conditioned. Many units accept pets. Enjoy a hike on the mountain or walk around the pond and take those special photographs. Ask about our romance packages with flowers, chocolates and champagne!
Cow Creek Trail follows Cow Creek, with its many beaver ponds, extending past the Bridal Falls turnoff as the Dark Mountain trail, then joining the Black Canyon trail to intersect the Lawn Lake trail shortly below the lake.[42] North Boundary Trail connects to the Lost Lake trail system. North Fork Trail begins outside of the park in the Comanche Peak Wilderness before reaching the park boundary and ending at Lost Lake. Stormy Peaks Trail connects Colorado State University's Pingree Park campus in the Comanche Peak Wilderness and the North Fork Trail inside the park.[42]
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