In the subalpine zone, lodgepole pines and huckleberry have established themselves in previous burn areas. Crystal clear lakes and fields of wildflowers are hidden among the trees. Mammals of the subalpine zone include bobcats, cougars, coyotes, elk, mule deer, chipmunks, shrews, porcupines and yellow-bellied marmots. Black bears are attracted by the berries and seeds of subalpine forests. Clark's nutcracker, Steller's jay, mountain chickadee and yellow-rumped warbler are some of the many birds found in the subalpine zone.[72] Sprague Lake and Odessa Lake are two of the park's subalpine lakes.[72]

Vacation in the Valley of the Sun in the winter of summer and find out why Fairplay is the activity hub of the Colorado Rocky Mountains. There is so much to do in the area including hiking, fishing, horseback riding and even canoeing and kayaking. Staying in the heart of the Rockies means you’re minutes from the action but nearby larger cities like Denver for a day trip. The owner of the property suggests having 4-wheel drive on your vehicle if you will be visiting in the winter.
Welcome to the 4 Seasons Inn on the Fall River in Estes Park. Nestled in the towering trees, the 4 Seasons Inn provides some of the most relaxing and romantic Estes Park lodging available to couples.  We have a spacious deck with hot tub and seating that looks over the river as it passes through our property.  There are also picnic and grilling areas for guest use.
A geographical anomaly is found along the slopes of the Never Summer Mountains where the Continental Divide forms a horseshoe–shaped bend for about 6 miles (9.7 km), heading from south–to–north but then curving sharply southward and westward out of the park.[5][27] The sharp bend results in streams on the eastern slopes of the range joining the headwaters of the Colorado River that flow south and west, eventually reaching the Pacific.[5][28] Meanwhile, streams on the western slopes join rivers that flow north and then east and south, eventually reaching the Atlantic.[5][28]
The park is home to many predatory animals, including Canadian lynx, foxes, bobcat, cougar, black bear, and coyotes. Wolves and grizzly bears were extirpated in the early 1900s. Most of these predators kill smaller animals, but mountain lions and coyotes kill deer and occasionally elk. Bears also eat larger prey. Moose have no predators in the park. Black bears are relatively uncommon in the park, numbering only 24-35 animals. They also have fewer cubs and the bears seem skinnier than they do in most areas.[79] Canadian lynx are quite rare within the park, and they have probably spread north from the San Juan Mountains, where they were reintroduced in 1999. Cougars feed mainly on mule deer in the park, and live 10–13 years. Cougar territories can be as large as 500 square miles.[80] Coyotes hunt both alone and in pairs, but occasionally hunt in packs. They mainly feed on rodents but occasionally bring down larger animals, including deer, and especially fawns and elk calves. Scat studies in Moraine Park showed that their primary foods were deer and rodents. They form strong family bonds and are very vocal.[81]
A gourmet breakfast is included in the price of suites and cabins. A great room and sunny family room offer games, piano, movie library, trail guides and maps. The warmth of knotty pine walls, wood floors, a big sandstone fireplace and family heirlooms transport you back to a simpler era. Let us pamper you for your romantic getaway, elopement or any occasion when you chose Estes Park.

Rustic elegance is how we describe our cabins and cottages, which range from 290 to 1100 square feet, and accommodate from two to twelve people. We also offer cabins with personal hot tubs ... perfect for relaxing after a day enjoying Estes Park and Rocky Mountain National Park. Families will enjoy our picnic tables and playground, with scenic hiking trails and endless fishing waters just minutes away. Pets are welcome with approval. We are open all year. Be sure to ask about our winter specials!
Colorado brims with historic monuments and nature trails that families with kids will love. Visit Bent's Old Fort National Historic Site to learn about the old traders, trappers, and Native Americans who once traded at this post. For pristine wilderness and solitude, the Continental Divide National Scenic Trail is a good choice. There's also San Isabel National Forest, which is home to Mount Elbert, Colorado's highest peak.

Rocky Mountain National Park is open to visitors 365 days a year, 24-hours a day. Whether you’re a quiet observer or a full-on expeditionist, there’s something for everyone, all year long. In the winter and spring months, sled, ski, ice climb, hike, or just play in the snow. In the summer and fall months, fish, rock climb, bike, run, or go horseback riding. It’s year-round adventure at the place where adventure is always waiting.

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