Rocky Mountain National Park encompasses 265,461 acres (414.78 sq mi; 1,074.28 km2) of federal land,[1] with an additional 253,059 acres (395.40 sq mi; 1,024.09 km2) of U.S. Forest Service wilderness adjoining the park boundaries.[24] The Continental Divide runs generally north–south through the center of the park,[25] with rivers and streams on the western side of the divide flowing toward the Pacific Ocean while those on the eastern side flow toward the Atlantic.[26]

The land at Dao House sits on what was once a gathering place of peace for rival Native American tribes in the region. Over the years, it has operated as a homestead, a ranch and a fox farm before becoming a lodge for the first time in 1948. In 2015, Dao House emerged as a meeting point of western and eastern cultures and today, they offer lodging, equestrian experiences and wellness activities including an oxygen lounge, internal martial arts, personalized retreat programs and shorter wellness getaways.


The history of Rocky Mountain National Park began when Paleo-Indians traveled along what is now Trail Ridge Road to hunt and forage for food.[11][12] Ute and Arapaho people subsequently hunted and camped in the area.[13][14] In 1820, the Long Expedition, led by Stephen H. Long for whom Longs Peak was named, approached the Rockies via the Platte River.[15][16] Settlers began arriving in the mid-1800s,[17] displacing the Native Americans who mostly left the area voluntarily by 1860,[18] while others were removed to reservations by 1878.[14]
The Pool is a large turbulent water pocket formed below where Spruce and Fern Creeks join the Big Thompson River. The winter route is along a gravel road, which leads to a trail at the Fern Lake trailhead. Along the route are beaver-cut aspen, frozen waterfalls on the cliffs, and the Arch Rocks.[44] The trail to Alberta Falls runs by Glacier Creek and Glacier Gorge.[44]
Rocky Mountain National Park is an American national park located approximately 76 mi (122 km) northwest of Denver International Airport[4] in north-central Colorado, within the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. The park is situated between the towns of Estes Park to the east and Grand Lake to the west. The eastern and westerns slopes of the Continental Divide run directly through the center of the park with the headwaters of the Colorado River located in the park's northwestern region.[5] The main features of the park include mountains, alpine lakes and a wide variety of wildlife within various climates and environments, from wooded forests to mountain tundra.
Strawberry Creek Cabin is a beautiful log retreat located in Beaver Creek’s most exclusive neighborhood. Take in the dramatic views of Beaver Creek as you cozy up in front of the fireplace in the living room or cook in the gourmet kitchen. The interior features designer decor, comfortable layout, and an amazing art collection. Enjoy the outdoor fire pit and hot tub on the private back patio overlooking the ski runs. Ski-in/ski-out access via the Settler’s Way run is just steps away.
Relaxing vacations at Boulder Brook’s adult-only romantic cabin resort includes soaks in the hot tub, enjoying the local wildlife, fishing in the river and sitting on your private deck. Choose between oversized studio Spa Suites, or our comfortable one and two bedroom suites. Downtown Estes Park is only 2 miles away with its charming shopping, beautiful river walk and tasty restaurants.
The park is home to many predatory animals, including Canadian lynx, foxes, bobcat, cougar, black bear, and coyotes. Wolves and grizzly bears were extirpated in the early 1900s. Most of these predators kill smaller animals, but mountain lions and coyotes kill deer and occasionally elk. Bears also eat larger prey. Moose have no predators in the park. Black bears are relatively uncommon in the park, numbering only 24-35 animals. They also have fewer cubs and the bears seem skinnier than they do in most areas.[79] Canadian lynx are quite rare within the park, and they have probably spread north from the San Juan Mountains, where they were reintroduced in 1999. Cougars feed mainly on mule deer in the park, and live 10–13 years. Cougar territories can be as large as 500 square miles.[80] Coyotes hunt both alone and in pairs, but occasionally hunt in packs. They mainly feed on rodents but occasionally bring down larger animals, including deer, and especially fawns and elk calves. Scat studies in Moraine Park showed that their primary foods were deer and rodents. They form strong family bonds and are very vocal.[81]
When planning your next family vacation, you will not find a more inviting campground than Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park Camp-Resort. Besides having the best cabin rentals available, Jellystone Parks are the cleanest, friendliest parks in North America. The campground staff is knowledgeable, and always available to assist you during your stay at our campgrounds.
Rustic elegance is how we describe our cabins and cottages, which range from 290 to 1100 square feet, and accommodate from two to twelve people. We also offer cabins with personal hot tubs ... perfect for relaxing after a day enjoying Estes Park and Rocky Mountain National Park. Families will enjoy our picnic tables and playground, with scenic hiking trails and endless fishing waters just minutes away. Pets are welcome with approval. We are open all year. Be sure to ask about our winter specials!
Mountain Shadows Resort features couples cabins with private hot tubs, king beds with luxury bedding, kitchenettes, sitting area with fireplace, double showers, small private decks (the better to enjoy our spectacular scenery) and much more. Superb wildlife viewing! Located just minutes from the main entrance to Rocky Mountain National Park and close to downtown Estes Park. Comfy, cozy and oh so Romantic!
Cow Creek Trail follows Cow Creek, with its many beaver ponds, extending past the Bridal Falls turnoff as the Dark Mountain trail, then joining the Black Canyon trail to intersect the Lawn Lake trail shortly below the lake.[42] North Boundary Trail connects to the Lost Lake trail system. North Fork Trail begins outside of the park in the Comanche Peak Wilderness before reaching the park boundary and ending at Lost Lake. Stormy Peaks Trail connects Colorado State University's Pingree Park campus in the Comanche Peak Wilderness and the North Fork Trail inside the park.[42]
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