When looking for Lodging in Estes Park then an Estes Park Cabin is the perfect choice! Annie's Mountain Retreat cater's to Couples and each cabin has its own Private Outdoor Hot Tub. Perfect for Honeymoons!  Three of our unique cabins are located along the Big Thompson River, in the Big Thompson Canyon, three miles from Estes Park, Colorado. These three cabins have River Access and lovely views of the Big Thompson Canyon. Our fourth unit borders Rocky Mountain National Park and is close to hiking trails. Our owner operated free standing cabins come complete with Many Special Amenities including Air Conditioning.
"Live-a-Little" is a 2-bedroom, 2-bathroom richly decorated cabin that can comfortably sleep 8 in a beautiful resort just minutes from the downtown Gatlinburg! Offering wooded and pond views (fishing is not permitted) and lots of room, this is the place to bring your whole family for a trip you won't forget. Relax with your evening hot chocolate in front of…
If you're pining to pull on the hiking boots or skis, swim in wild lakes or go canoeing in the morning, a cabin's location presents a perfect choice. Aside from the abundance of nature, cabins can also offer plenty for families. Take cabin resorts, which often have pools, playgrounds and on-site restaurants. Or, look to larger cabins with multiple bedrooms and kitchens.
The nearest airport is Denver International Airport[91] and the closest train station is the Denver Union Station. Estes Park may be reached by rental car, shuttle or RTD bus.[91][98] During peak tourist season, there is free shuttle service within the park and the town of Estes Park provides shuttle service to Estes Park Visitor Center, surrounding campgrounds, and the Rocky Mountain National Park's shuttles.[91]
The Rocky Mountain National Park Act was signed by President Woodrow Wilson on January 26, 1915, establishing the park boundaries and protecting the area for future generations.[2] The Civilian Conservation Corps built the main automobile route, Trail Ridge Road, in the 1930s.[2] In 1976, UNESCO designated the park as one of the first World Biosphere Reserves.[6] In 2017, more than 4.4 million recreational visitors entered the park.[7] The park is one of the most visited in the National Park System, ranking as the third most visited national park in 2015.[8]
Rocky Mountain National Park is home to many species of animals, including nearly 70 mammals and almost 300 species of birds. This diversity is due to the park's varying topography, which creates a variety of habitats. However, some species have been extirpated from the park, including the gray wolf, the wolverine, the grizzly bear, and the American bison.

Did some snowshoeing today(2/17/19), great conditions for it! We got to the trail and started about 8:45 am, snow was still fresh. Parking lot wasn’t too crowded and didn’t really see too many others until we were heading back. Only a few spots uphill, relatively even terrain with nice views. Did Copeland Falls and Calypso Cascades, a short part of Ouzel falls to the overlook, which was a good point to turn around.

Rocky Mountain National Park is an American national park located approximately 76 mi (122 km) northwest of Denver International Airport[4] in north-central Colorado, within the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. The park is situated between the towns of Estes Park to the east and Grand Lake to the west. The eastern and westerns slopes of the Continental Divide run directly through the center of the park with the headwaters of the Colorado River located in the park's northwestern region.[5] The main features of the park include mountains, alpine lakes and a wide variety of wildlife within various climates and environments, from wooded forests to mountain tundra.
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