The park is home to many predatory animals, including Canadian lynx, foxes, bobcat, cougar, black bear, and coyotes. Wolves and grizzly bears were extirpated in the early 1900s. Most of these predators kill smaller animals, but mountain lions and coyotes kill deer and occasionally elk. Bears also eat larger prey. Moose have no predators in the park. Black bears are relatively uncommon in the park, numbering only 24-35 animals. They also have fewer cubs and the bears seem skinnier than they do in most areas.[79] Canadian lynx are quite rare within the park, and they have probably spread north from the San Juan Mountains, where they were reintroduced in 1999. Cougars feed mainly on mule deer in the park, and live 10–13 years. Cougar territories can be as large as 500 square miles.[80] Coyotes hunt both alone and in pairs, but occasionally hunt in packs. They mainly feed on rodents but occasionally bring down larger animals, including deer, and especially fawns and elk calves. Scat studies in Moraine Park showed that their primary foods were deer and rodents. They form strong family bonds and are very vocal.[81]
According to my GPS app the winter track up the hillside from Dream Lake is slightly off from the actual trail, but connects up with the trail within 1/4 mile. Also, about 1/4 mile from Haiyaha the trail peters out and the established track goes straight downhill to the lake. We couldn't figure out where the actual trail was supposed to go so we followed the tracks; it's very steep but will get you to the lake.
Region 4 is the heart of the park with easy road and trail access, great views, and lake hikes including the most popular trails.[35] Flattop Mountain is a tundra hike and the easiest hike to the Continental Divide in the park. Crossing over Flattop Mountain, the hike to Hallett Peak passes through three climate zones, traversing the ridge that supports Tyndall Glacier and finally ascending to the summit of Hallett Peak.[44]
Not everyone can afford the Bavarian-inspired, massive mountain lodge in Vail straight out of a Grimm’s fairytale complete with a private wine cellar and five jacuzzis, but boy do we have a treat for you. Bunkering down for the winter watching Netflix in your own bed sure is relaxing, but we promise cozying up in a luxury cabin is a better way to spend those dark, chilly winter nights in Colorado. Whether you’re looking for an awesome après-ski space to party with friends or a rustic log home retreat for a little downtime deep in the wilderness, these cheap luxury cabin rentals from Glamping Hub and Airbnb will make sure your winter getaway is to remember — and not because of the hefty bill.
The Lowdown: If you want a little peace and quiet outside of town, this one-bedroom and one-bathroom cabin hideaway is your best bet. This rustic log cabin is nestled in the San Juan Mountains and features a wood-beamed ceiling, bay windows with views of the treetops, wood-burning stove, deck with patio furniture, an old record player, southwestern decor and even a yoga studio for some morning meditation and vinyasa time. Starting at $64 a night, you better start packing your bags.
Wow!  How can you not love RMNP!  I have been to several national parks now and this is definitely ranked in the top 3.  Every few feet I was stopping to take another picture.  This park is definitely a photographers paradise. I spent 1 full day and 2 half days in the park and still didn't get see everything.  However, it gave me a good overview and left me wanting more for another visit later.
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